Fishing Post Hurrican Ida

I got a chance to fish for the first time, post Hurricane Ida this morning. To say the hurricane was catastrophic is an understatement. The national media has just been focused on New Orleans. There are places in rural South Louisiana that will take many years to repair. Some businesses that have been open for 70 plus years were destroyed and will not be rebuilt. We continue to pray for those who have been effected. Personally, my house didn’t receive any damage, except for 150 feet of downed fence. My parents in Thibodaux lost nearly all the shingles on their roof but suffered no major damage. Many, if not most of able-bodied South Louisianans have been helping neighbors, friends, and family. I made it down to the epicenter of the eye-wall, Port Forcheon, to help a friend repair some plumbing on his camp. While his camp suffered major damage, he was fortunate and he will be able to rebuild. Here are some pictures from some of the damage there:

This large houseboat (barge) broke off its mooring, took out an entire camp and damaged much of the boat lifts in the area. Oh, the roof in the foreground belonged to someone’s camp.
My friend’s boat is a total loss. Look how the winds completely removed and relocated the roof.
There was a building on that empty slab. Notice, however, the camps in the background look untouched.

After spending a day down there, I knew I needed to get on the water, but I wasn’t going to be heading south for a while. So, I decided to do some much needed, hurricane recovery at my peaceful, happy place. My view this morning was much more peaceful, as you can see in the next photo. I watched a flock of ten teal buzz over the water as I unloaded my kayak.

A much calmer and tranquil morning.

The fishing was great! I caught 10 bass and lost about a handful as well. They were all caught on a frog-colored deer hair popper, tied on a size 2 hook. This is one of my smaller deer hair bugs tied with rubber skirt legs. The first bass of the morning

The slight fog on the water indicated the water is warmer than the cool morning air.
Bass number 2
Bass number 3. They kept getting bigger.
A chunky number 4
Number 5
Number 6 was 2.75 lbs and was 18 inches long.
Number 7
Here’s number 8. The sun was starting to really get bright at about 8:30.
Number 9 was released quickly back.
Number 10 was another good chunky bass that weighed over 2 pounds.

After the sun had come up pretty good and the topwater bite slowed down, I switched to a baitfish streamer pattern. I had fished with it for about a half hour without a bite. Then I received a text with a couple pictures from my daughter, who is in Orlando with my wife, my son-in-law and the three grandkids. I put my rod down to look at the photo. When I put my phone away and I picked up my rod, I realized I had a fish on. I never got to see it. I tried to set the hook in it and it doubled my rod over. The fish ran underneath my kayak and then it promptly got off. Oh well… that’s fishing. If you’ve followed this blog before, you have read that my friend who owns this lake wants me to harvest fish under 15 inches. So, I took home six for supper.

Today’s harvest

Please pray for those who’ve lost so much to this hurricane. Everyone I spoke to yesterday said they would rebuild. They will build it stronger. It seems after each hurricane, we learn more about how to effectively build to withstand strong winds from a major hurricane. I just hope I don’t have to see another one like this one in my lifetime.

Until then, tight loops and tight lines!