Summer Brown-lining (or ditch pitching)

I recently heard the term ‘brown-lining’ used by some buddies of mine in the Red Stick Fly Fishers Club. I kind of had an idea what they meant because I knew what blue lining was. Blue lining is fishing small, cold water creeks for trout. You look on a map of the area and you hike on out to the “blue line.” Since we don’t have any cold water creeks in south Louisiana, we do the next best thing…brown lining, or what I used to call it…ditch pitching. I guess brown lining sounds more sophisticated? or not??

Anyway, now that I’m through with camps, I wanted to get a mid morning trip in. My buddies said that this kind of fishing is fun, because you never know what you’ll see or catch. This morning’s trip was that sort of trip. I pulled my truck over to a drainage ditch that I had actually fished many years ago with a former student of mine. I remembered catching a lot of bass, bluegill, and what I consider the most beautiful and colorful fresh water fish in Louisiana, the long-eared sunfish. That was my target species for the morning.

We have been in a mini drought here in south Louisiana and I was prepared to see very shallow, but clear water. I would have to look for deeper cuts in order to find fish. I began with a hare’s ear nymph and I quickly began casting to some pretty spooky fish. It didn’t take long for me to realize these fish were looking up, so I tied on a yellow foam fly. No sooner than I had made the switch, I landed a pretty bluegill. I also quickly landed a small largemouth black bass, but I lost my fly when I tried to set the hook on another fish and it got caught in the tree behind me. No worries because I had a whole box of foam flies. I tied on a black beetle and quickly caught several more bluegill.

This bluegill sucked in a black beetle

Soon there after, I landed my target species, a long eared sunfish.

Look how pretty this little guy was

And another and another. This went on for an hour or so until I got tired of catching these. I then spotted a garfish sitting still in about 10 inches or so of water. I tied on a squirrel-tail jig pattern that looked like a leech or a small crawfish. After several bad casts, I managed to get one close to those sharp teeth. It turned on my presentation and crushed the fly. I actually got the hook to stick (miraculously) and I had to figure out how I was going to land it without a net. I worked it down to an area that looked like I could ease it over a mud bank. Well, that hook set eventually worked itself out and the garfish casually swam away before I could snap a picture.

One of the cool things about this kind of fishing is you really never know what you will see or what you will hook into. I saw a catfish but I couldn’t get it to eat. I then began sight fishing to garfish. I hooked three more but each one ended up either getting off the hook or cutting my line. It was fun anyway. I figured I had had enough with the garfish so I tied up another foam fly that my friend, Drew Ross ties for trout and carp. I picked up several more fish on that fly before I called it a morning.

I have to remember to bring a net and some good hiking shoes next time. I hyperextended my big toe trying to climb up out of the ditch and I’m icing it down as I write this 😦

Here are some pictures from the morning:

These fish are so pretty, they look like they belong in an aquarium.

There were many other things to see this morning included great white herons, geese, a multitude of turtles, and one small water snake. If you haven’t tried “brown lining ” or “ditch pitching,” then you should give it a try.

Tight loops and tight lines 🙂

4 thoughts on “Summer Brown-lining (or ditch pitching)

      • Yep. Tuesday is my off day. Sadly, today that meant mowing the lawn. Looking forward to hearing how you do tomorrow. I’m going to try to do the same Sunday if the weather holds.

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