I’ve been searching and searching…and then I found you :)

I have been trying to find a consistent sacalait bite in our neighborhood lake all spring, but I have fallen short on several occasions. Then there were other obligations like school, family, and weather events. So, I don’t post the trips when I go out and I skunk (rarely happens) or I only catch a few bluegill or a bass or two. I guess I need to post those reports too, so I look human πŸ™‚ However, I took the opportunity to walk my kayak over to the neighborhood lake this afternoon after chores (repairs to the chlorinator) and supper and fish for an hour.

I met a young man and his dad at my “put in” spot and we struck up a conversation. I watched him (a 5th grader) reel in a small bass on plastic. I tried to lure him over to the “dark side,” the fly rod, and his dad said he remembered his grandfather trying to teach him to catch fish on the fly rod and how much of a thrill it was to catch fish on a fly rod. After about 10 minutes or so of chit chat, I finally launched my kayak and was paddling over to one of my spots that had produced sacalait in the past. I was fishing with one of my black and chartreuse fluff butts for about 10 minutes when I saw my strike indicator disappear beneath the murky water. I stiffened up my fly rod and I found myself doubled over with a slab sacalait on the other end. The young man was very impressed on the bank.

My first nice slap on the fluff butt

Five minutes later and my 5 wt was doubled over again. I eased another 15 inch crappie (sacalait) into my kayak. The little boy was so excited now. I think he and his dad were heading over to Bass Pro to purchase a kayak and a fly rod. LOL!

slab number 2

So, you get the picture. Cast, strip, repeat. Cast, strip, wait a while. Repeat. Cast, strip… watch the strike indicator disappear, set the hook and ease another slab into the kayak.

I know. This is getting monotonous

After about an hour of this, the bite stopped, but by then, I had put a half dozen on my stringer. For those of you who don’t know this (I’m sure most subscribers to this blog do), crappie, or sacalait like we call them down here (Native American/French translation = “sack of milk”), is one of the best eating fish that swim in fresh water. When I got home I put some of them on the measuring board.

14.5 inches
Just under 15 inches

This was the largest in the bunch

I sent these pictures with a message to the members of my fly fishing club and I’ll repeat it here. There is so much joy and peace in God’s good outdoors. Get off the couch, throw the gaming devices in the garbage, and get outside and experience the beauty that God has created for us. It is the best therapy out there, it’s less expensive than a psychiatrist, and it can provide you with dinner too. πŸ™‚

Tight loops and tight lines to all of you!

When the Good Lord Provides

It’s been a windy spring down here in south Louisiana so the fishing chances have been slim. However, that doesn’t mean I haven’t gotten a few chances to hit the water between storms. As the title of this post eludes, “I love it when the Good Lord provides.” He provides me with a wonderful family, good health, and yes, even the windy days we have been having. But this is a fishing blog, so let’s get down to it. As our spring break approached, I looked for opportunities to get on the water of my local neighborhood lakes to a little “catch and eat.” I needed some fish for those Friday fish fries. The sacalait just haven’t shown themselves yet, except for maybe a couple here and there, but nothing that would be worthwhile to keep to put in some hot grease. So, I changed tactics and I decided to tie on a hare’s ear nymph and see if the bream and chinquapin would be willing to provide dinner. My hunch proved to be correct one afternoon as I was able to sight fish to some chinquapin and bluegill that were stalking the shallows.

This fat red ear (chinquapin) went for the hare’s ear.
Another large chinquapin
And a few bluegill made it to the fish fry

After a successful afternoon trip, I decided to wake up early Saturday morning to see if I could replicate my luck. I was able to catch a few chunky bass in the morning and then I managed to put a few more big bluegill and a couple sacalait on the stringer.

The LSU popper is still the color of choice around here
These joined the Friday lenten fish fry too.

Well, fast forward to Good Friday morning. I knew my three grandchildren would be heading to Baton Rouge later that day and I wanted to fry fish for them for supper. We had a good downpour overnight so I figured the water would be running over the dam from the upper lake to the lower lake. I got out early to see if the shad were doing their thing at the base of the dam and sure enough, they were in numbers that attracted a lot of bass. I hooked a descent bass early on my musicdoc shad and I then changed my retrieve to allow the fly to work lower in the water column. I was able to land four slab sacalait before the bite stopped. I was just in time to walk my kayak back home to greet my grandchildren. My granddaughter was more than happy to take a picture of Poppie with his fish.

The smile on his face says it all. BTW, the fish weighed a pound and a half.

So, after lunch, I dug up a few worms and offered my three-year-old grandson an opportunity to catch a fish of his own. He had a ball and he caught his first fish ever on his Mickey Mouse rod and reel.

Proud young fisherman
Fish number 2

We had a wonderful Easter with the grandkids and we were sad to see them go. Our weekend was fun of tractor rides, Easter egg hunts, kayaking, dancing, and a crawfish boil. So Monday rolls around and I’m looking at the winds and weather for this week…my off week. Wow. 15-20 mph winds Monday and Tuesday. That’s no good. My wife and I walked the neighborhood Monday and we came on a stash of blackberries. I rode back there later with a gallon ziplock bag and managed to pick about 10 cups of berries, which I turned into some good blackberry jelly.

That’s a gallon sized bag
Which we turned into blackberry jelly

Like the title of this post says, the Good Lord does provide. Oh, and speaking of providing, I got up early this morning before the winds kicked up and I managed to catch 5 nice bass on the LSU deer hair popper. No sacalait though, but that’s OK. These bass were released to go make babies (one was full of eggs)

One More Post for 2021

I didn’t know how to title this post. My choices were several, including “Fun on the 3 wt,” “A Crappie Ending to a Crappy Year,” “The Sunfish Trifecta,” or “Self-Quarantine Fun.” I couldn’t find a winner so I just chose, “One More Post for 2021.” Also, please forgive the two attempts I made at inserting a quick video. Not I cannot seem to be able to delete them. Just read on. πŸ™‚

I had actually been looking forward to this week. I had a whole week off from teaching and I had just said goodbye to my daughter’s family and my three grandchildren. Wouldn’t you know it, the weather got hot, cloudy, and windy…not good redfish sight fishing weather. In fact, the weather looked pretty crappy so I’ve been staying inside, tying flies and cleaning up my tying table.

When I woke up this morning, I couldn’t stand it anymore, so I got a cup of coffee, did my “Bible in a Year” podcast, and I headed out to my neighborhood lake with my kayak in tow, a popper on a 5 wt, and a fluff butt on the 3 wt. I made a valiant attempt to hit the banks with the popper but I was having no luck at all. So I decided to focus on my favorite sunfish, bluegill and red-ear sunfish (chinquapin). I started catching small bluegill right away.

small but pretty
a little larger at 7 inches

I realized that the larger fish were hanging in deeper water, about 8-10 feet from the bank. I then hooked into a descent chinquapin.

These red-ear sunfish are thick and they fight hard on a 3 wt

Not long after that fish, I hooked what is probably my personal best chinquapin on my fly rod.

I measured that big one out at 11 inches on my paddle and I released it.

I was about to call it a day, when I caught my third different species in the sunfish family, a crappie (sacalait).

This one was 9 inches long

I was completely content at this point and I started heading back to my pickup point. That’s when I hooked a larger sacalait.

Now I had just told one of my neighbors who lives on the lake that I wasn’t keeping fish today. Heck, I hadn’t even thought about bringing my stringer because I’ve never caught a bunch of sacalait or big chinquapin in the month of December on the lake. Well, I proceeded to catch three more sacalait (all big enough to fillet) and I released them. That’s when it hit me…we have been eating Christmas leftovers for five days now and it’s time to eat something different. So, I beached my kayak and took the five minute walk over to my house to grab my stringer. I paddled back to where I had caught the last three sacalait, and wouldn’t you know it, I couldn’t get a bite…well for about five minutes or so. Then I caught a nice one…then another… then another.

I had one break my size 3x tippet. I found that to be strange because it broke it off at the loop where I made the loop-to-loop connection. I patiently tied on another three-foot piece of tippet material and another fluff butt and I continued to catch a couple more sacalait before that tippet broke too. I was beginning to wonder if the brand new Orvis 3x tippet was defective. I wasn’t going to chance breaking off again, so I tied on 0x on my 3 wt. πŸ™‚ I finally called it a day with 8 good slabs.

They weren’t “hammers” but they were good-sized “slabs”

Anyway, I couldn’t think of a better way to spend my morning with just two days left to the year. Heck, I’m probably going to try another neighborhood lake tomorrow morning. What a great way to end 2021!

Fried to perfection

A Crappie End to 2021

The Neighborhood Lakes, Revisited πŸ™‚

Based on the fact that my last post here was a “revisited” post, and we’ve had all this rain lately, I did want to share a small story about the benefits of this rain during the months of April, May, and early June. During those months, the shad in the neighborhood lakes begin to spawn. They look for floating debris (weeds), foam, and shoreline and they do their “morning dance,” as I call it every morning from about a half hour before sunup right to sunrise. When the rains come and the water overflows from the upper lake, over the dam, to the lower lake, the morning bite can be spectacular! It’s nothing to see over a thousand shad “fluttering” by the bank edges, but they especially like the moving water and the foam it creates as it cascades over the man-made dam. When this happens, one gets to witness the feeding frenzy that the bass and sacalait have for one special half hour in the wee wee hours of the morning.

I made the 6-minute walk a couple days last week and I was treated to this special phenomenon…and a few fish. All fish were caught on my shad-fly, which I think I have finally perfected. One morning I caught 5 sacalait and three nice bass. The very next morning, I caught 3 sacalait and three bass. The bass were all released back into the lakes. The sacalait will be released into a skillet of hot grease very soon. πŸ™‚

I do love this time of year!

I do love this time of year!

I sent a few pictures to a buddy of mine who is in my opinion, THE fish whisperer, and he commented back, “Don’t you just love this time of year?” With commitments these past three weekends, it has left me stuck in my neighborhood to do some quick fishing. That means, when my schedule allows, I am only 10 minutes from literally being on the water. I’ve been testing those waters these past three weeks or so and I have caught a few bass, here and there, with that one Saturday morning where I caught the 3.5 and the 4.1 pound bass. Other than that, I’ve caught a bass or two on nearly every outing but nothing really big…and the elusive sacalait (aka crappie or white perch) have been non existent. That is, until this weekend.

I heard from one of my students that a few people had been catching sacalait at a nearby lake so I loaded up my kayak and made the 7 minutes drive to my spot. I checked on Google Earth and it’s about a half mile hike to get to the lake, while carting my kayak on a crushed limestone path. With that kind of effort, I was not going to do a half-hearted morning trip. I worked my tail off and I caught 4 bass and four big sacalait for my efforts. I got home a little after noon and after a quick lunch and a few chores around the house, I was ready for another trip to my neighborhood lake, which is only 1 tenth of a mile to and from my house πŸ™‚ I was using my fluff butt under a vosi and on my third or fourth cast, my cork slipped under the dark clear water. Enough for “catch and release.” That one was going to get released into a skillet with hot grease…and the next one and the next. By the time the bite stopped I had caught 20 (I only kept 13 of the nicer ones)

Going to have a nice fish fry with these
Two of the bigger ones from the day

So Sunday afternoon, I was itching to get back on the water but I wanted to try a new spot, also in my neighborhood. This lake is deeper than the first and it seems to hold larger fish (especially the bass) but they are much harder to find because there is so much cover. It took some doing but I found a few big sacalait that wanted to play (the biggest going a pound and a half). I only caught six before I snagged the sunken tree that they were holding next to and that ended the bite. I searched the rest of my “spots” in that lake but I had no luck. So, I carted my kayak to the lake where I had caught 20 just the day before. I was greeted with a nice fatty and ended up catching four more before I called it an evening.

This one had shoulders πŸ™‚
Only 9 but everyone was filleted.

Take a close look at these next two pictures. One was taken on Saturday (I’m wearing jeans and tennis shoes) and the other is Sunday afternoon (in the sandals and shorts). I didn’t adjust the fly for the picture. It’s exactly where the fly was lodged in the fish’s mouth. I think nearly ALL my fish were hooked in exactly the same place.

Another thing I learned this weekend is, you can never have enough fluff butts and VOSIs in your box πŸ™‚ I lost several over the past two days. I see we have rain forecast in the days ahead so I’m going to get on my vice and tie a few more of the chartreuse and black up. I think the fishing should be great for the next two weeks leading up to the next full moon. Tight loops and tight lines πŸ™‚

Covid thoughts (how I’m dealing with the stress)

This challenging time in our lives has got a lot of people battling depression. Some people are actually fighting the virus itself, some have family and friends battling the disease, and some are manning the front lines of the battle and will suffer from PTSD for some time afterward. On the other hand, some of us are fortunate to be able to work from home. Some people think I’m just enjoying a staycation. Nothing could be further than the truth. For a music educator whose classes are predominantly performance based, I’ve been scrambling to create online lessons that are engaging and are rigorous. My wife has noted on several occasions that she has never seen me work as hard as I have these past two weeks. At the tender age of 60, I’m actually in a high risk group (I’m older and I suffer from asthma). I tell my students that every morning you wake up, you have a choice to make. You can either be the person who whines and complains about your situation or you can be the person who makes the most of your situation. Either way, I think everyone needs to be able to deal with stress. Stress is a part of every person’s life. How we deal with stress makes all the difference in the world. I am fortunate to have a hobby…fly fishing.

Those of you who know me well, know that I work very hard, but I play hard too. So, I have had to make time for myself. Case in point…last Wednesday I received a call from a colleague of mine, our basketball coach, that he wanted to do some fishing and he wanted a change of scenery. I offered him a chance to join me for a couple hours one afternoon after we were through with online classes. I knew the bass would want to play but I’ve been intrigued by the sacalait (crappie) that I know good and well are in our lake but I haven’t “found them” yet. Well, about 10 minutes into our trip, my buddy yells out to me, “Hey, Doc. Are you keeping sacalait?” Β I immediately stuck my paddle in the water and high-tailed it over to where he was. I knew there was a sunken tree in the bottom there so I started tossing a chartreuse and black fluff butt in the area. Five minutes later, I was bringing a chunky little 10 inch one in my kayak. I put on a VOSI (vertical oriented strike indicator) to keep me from hanging up on the tree and I caught 23 more. Most were around the 6 – 7 inch range (not my keeping size) but I was able to put together a stringer of 9 for our Friday fish fry. IMG_1113.jpeg

I went back the next morning and I counted 40! Again, I only keep the nice ones and I had a few that fit that requirement. IMG_1116.jpeg

Saturday morning, I got an invite to join a couple of my “band parents” and their son at our favorite lake for some bass fishing. Their son is in my high school fly fishing club and I decided to go and help him (from a 6-foot distance) with his casting, etc. While I wasn’t able to get him to catch a fish, I ended up catching and releasing nine chunky bass of my own.

IMG_1118.jpegIMG_1119.jpeg
That last one was full of eggs and she weighed 2.8 lbs.IMG_1120.jpeg

So, Sunday, Monday, and Tuesday all pass and all I can do is school work and house work. My Wednesday was going to start out slow with nothing to do until 9 AM, so I got up and carted my kayak on over to the neighborhood lake at 6:30. I figured I could fish for an hour and a half before I would head home, shower, and make my 9 AM class. When I got out there I began hearing crashes on the bank. It was the telltale sound of bass chasing shad. The shad spawn is beginning and the bass know it. I was able to land two and lose one in the first 15 minutes or so. Slowly my interest changed and I switched to my fluff butt rod. After about 10 minutes or so, I put my first sacalait on my stringer. The bite slowly began to pick up and by 8 AM I had landed 24. I had a heck of a stringer of big ones (I only kept 9), with four of them going at or above a pound and three-quarters. So, this Friday, we will fry fish and I’ll have some to pass over the fence to my neighbor (social distancing) too. GOPR0365.jpegGOPR0367.jpeg

I realized after taking the picture that I was wearing that shirt. “Poppy,” as some of us called him, was my favorite Irish priest, Fr. Michael Collins, who passed from this world and is now with our Heavenly Father. While Fr. Mike wasn’t a fisherman, I’m sure he was with me and I was feeling the luck of the Irish that morning.

While so many are suffering around this world right now, I thank God for the many blessings he has bestowed on me and my family. I am especially thankful for the gift of life and my health…and the gift of being able to blow off steam by taking a five minute walk to a quality fishing hole.

Slabs in the neighborhood lake.

While catching large bass, bull redfish, and speckled trout are fun, nothing gets me excited as when the crappie (sacalait) start biting down south. These fish are some of the best tasting fish in fresh water and can provide some good fun on a 5 weight fly rod. I heard during this past summer that our neighborhood homeowners association stocked the lakes with bass, bluegill, catfish, and sacalait following our flood of two years ago. I recently caught a random catfish but I hadn’t had any luck with the “sack of milk.” I did catch a couple of small (up to 10 inches) ones early this winter during a scouting trip, just to get on the water. That all changed this week.

We recently welcomed into this world my new grandchild, a grandson, Benson Philip Wijay. I have been so excited and the joy of welcoming him into our family (no I haven’t officially bought him a fly rod just yet) has been the only thing on my mind. That all changed early this week when my daughter (Benson’s mom) was rushed to the hospital with some major postpartum complications. The good news is, my daughter is now home with her children and her health is not in danger. My wife has been in Texas with them and we’ve been communicating via cell phones and texting for the past four days. Now that things have cooled down, I was in need of some some stress relief. IMG_0653.jpeg
Big sister is counting his toes and checking him for ticks. πŸ™‚

The relief came earlier this week when I was home early (about 4:30) and figured I’ll walk my kayak down to the lake to try a little afternoon fishing. I was armed with one fly rod with an olive fluff butt tied to the end of it. I took a moment (like I usually do) to Β make a quick pass around the launch area and clean up some of the trash that the recent winds have knocked into the water. After that, I began hitting the banks, looking for some big bream, sacalait, or anything else that might be fooled by the marabou jig. The fishing started off pretty good when I hooked into a 12 inch bass. Then I fished around a stretch of water that usually holds bass during the summertime. I immediately hooked into what I thought was a big bass. Come to find out, it was a 13.5 inch sacalait! Hold on, now. I usually practice “catch and release” when I fish freshwater, but when I catch big chinquapin or sacalait, I practice catch and release…into a skillet of hot grease :). Β A few casts later, and I had another one on. I noticed that these fish didn’t fight like normal crappie. Once hooked, they took off like a missile. They didn’t jump out the water, but they fought ferociously. I ended up having one straighten out an old hook (no kidding) and two break off my 6 lb. tippet. I frantically tied on some stronger tippet and was down to my last olive fluff butt. I finished up my stringer of 7 fish.GOPR0056.jpeg

I can’t remember fresh fish tasting so good. I had to fillet them because they were so big and I ended up eating three for supper. The other four will be frozen for a supper in the near future (lent is coming soon).

So I gave the fish a day off and my schedule freed my up two days later. I was in luck because it was the day before a cold front was predicted to hit Baton Rouge. I got out earlier this time and went to the same spot I caught fish earlier in the week. This time, I rigged two rods; one with a black and chartreuse fluff butt and another with an olive fluff butt. I was going to see which one was more productive.

Within the first couple of casts, I was fighting an angry slab of fish, caught on the black and chartreuse fluff butt. GOPR0047.jpegAfter two of those, I switched to the olive. I caught four quick fish before switching back to the black and chartreuse. By now, the action had slowed and I think I caught one more on the black and chartreuse to bring my total to 7. I left that spot and searched a few other promising areas but didn’t get anything else except a few small bream. I did manage to catch two sizable chinquapin (one touched 10 inches) before heading back with a neighbor to my original spot. He wanted to see me catch one with the fly rod and I promptly caught two more to finish my stringer (those last two were caught on the olive pattern). I left him to fish with a black and chartreuse beetle spin but I don’t think he got any hits. It was starting to get dark and I had fish to clean so I bid him farewell and walked my kayak home.GOPR0052.jpeg
Nine fish were all I felt like cleaning tonight, so I left them biting πŸ™‚

Anyway, the fishing sure was therapeutic and came at a perfect time. I’ll give those fish a rest and try some new water next week. According to local reports, it’s on like gangbusters right now…and the next full moon isn’t for a couple of weeks. Time to get some fish for those Friday Lenten Fish Fries. By the way, I was able to land 6 fish on the olive fly and 3 on the black and chartreuse. I think I need to do a lot more research πŸ™‚

One More Trip

I know I’ve already posted my end-of-the-year report, but I couldn’t resist just one more short outing to my neighborhood lake. It began when my brother called me and said he’s trying to get his dog to learn to sit still in his pirogue while he fishes so he wanted to launch in my lake. He met me at my house a little after 3:30 and I hadn’t really planned on fishing with him. The weather has been real cloudy and dreary, plus my daughter, her husband, and my granddaughter have been in town for a New Year’s visit.

I helped my brother unload his pirogue and we walked the block and a half down to where I normally put in. When I got there and saw just how calm and pristine the lake looked, I just couldn’t resist. I hustled back home, put my kayak on wheels, grabbed my fly rod, and joined him on the lake.

It was neat fishing with my brother and we reminisced about old times fishing and hunting together. We were both avid hunters when we were younger but now we both enjoy fishing and the beauty, peace and relaxation that it brings. My brother brought one rod and fished a swim bait for bass. I brought a 5 wt rod with an olive fluff butt. My brother is and artist and has a great eye for things that would make a great painting, so he was snapping pictures most of the time. I, however, proceeded to catch about 8 small bream and two sacalait. We only fished for about an hour but it reminded both of us what really matters…family, friends, and the grace and beauty of God’s wonderful creations. Happy New Year to all those of you who follow this blog. I hope to get on the water more often in 2019. Funny thing is, I just realized I started the year off with a sacalait (crappie) and I ended it with one as well. πŸ™‚

Tight loops and tight lines to you all!

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Spring trip to CENLA

Spring trip to CENLA

Although it isn’t officially spring yet, I’ve been itching to make the 3 hour drive north to my buddy’s house in central Louisiana (CENLA) to do some bass, crappie, bluegill, red-ear sunfish…and whatever else would bite on a fly rod trip. I left Baton Rouge right after school and met Catch at the launch site to fish Lake Valentine. For about an hour-and-a-half, we fished the clear water in the lake and I actually skunked. I was fishing a new frog pattern (see my previous post) and I couldn’t get a bite. Catch, however caught a half dozen or so bass and had this nice one that he caught on a small, dark green popper.IMG_2207.jpg

Then next day, we got up early and headed over to the same lake to try the morning bite. I managed a couple of dinks but nothing substantial. Catch had similar luck and by 10:30 or so, we decided to call it a morning, regroup, and try “plan B.” The wind had picked up substantially and the fish just weren’t cooperating. What a difference 12 hours makes! We were treated to some beautify wildlife, including this friendly little guy.IMG_2256.jpg

Anyway, plan B was to fish another local lake for some coveted crappie, (also know as sacalait or white perch). I have a friend who’s dad is getting up in age and I promised him some fish for a fry. He loves sacalait too! We probably arrived at Fullerton Lake around 2 PM and fished until sunset. Catch started catching bass right off the bat. I wanted to target sacalait so our strategies differed. He was fishing with poppers while I fished mostly a fluff butt (actually a “silly” butt). I wasn’t having any luck with the sacalait but I did catch two bull bream over 8 inches. I paddled over to Catch to see what he was doing and he said he had caught and released about a dozen small bass. The bass in Fullerton aren’t as big as those in Valentine. Fullerton is loaded with downed trees and logs and makes a perfect habitat for the coveted panfish. We, however, had missed the major spawning period for the crappie and reports hadn’t been that good. I did manage to catch two really nice ones (14 and 15 inches). When I added those to the bream and the one sacalait that Catch caught, we ended up with a nice stringer of 9 bull bream and three sacalait. I caught 4 bass on poppers and Catch caught 21. I was disappointed that I didn’t get any strikes on my deer hair frog. I downsized my popper and that’s when I began to catch some bass. On a side note, I don’t think I can recall ever fishing in a place that had so many BULL FROGS. They were croaking all afternoon. I even saw several in the grass along the banks. I tried to get a picture but I spooked the one that I was able to get close to. Here are a few pictures from the day.

IMG_2258.jpgThat’s a 15-inch slab!
IMG_2251.jpg
A chunky bass caught on the fly rod in Lake Valentine Saturday morning.

I did manage to get some pictures of Catch casting from his kayak.
Hee is a series of pictures I took. He makes it look effortless.

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Mardi Gras Madness

Many in south Louisiana think of parades, king cake, masked balls, and floats during this time of year. Me? Β I think about where can I get on some water and fish. While others think about catching beads and doubloons, I think about catching some fish that will make it into the grease for a lenten Friday meal. The past few years, I’ve been fortunate to hook up with my buddy in Central Louisiana to catch some bass, chinquapin, and sacalait. This year, our schedules, the large amount of rain, and other factors have made it impossible to fish in CENLA. That left me with plan B, plan C, and of course, no plan at all πŸ™‚

When the weather was too windy or rainy, I stayed in, tied flies, and took care of some “honey dos” around the house. That didn’t mean I didn’t sneak out for a couple hours at sunrise or sunset to try out some of my new flies on some of the locals. We had some really foggy mornings that gave way to some windy days. My first fish of the week came from my “Plan B,” our Β Mylocal neighborhood lake.GOPR3821.jpg
As you can see, it ate one of my crease flies. My next bass also came from Plan B but I was fishing for sacalait and bream when this guy came up and ate my fluff butt.GOPR3822.jpg
Since I do not keep bass (especially during the spawn) and I really wanted some fish for a Friday lenten supper, I made an hour run over to Black Lake to see if the sacalait wanted to play. After talking to a couple of the locals at the launch, I learned that the sacalait bite hadn’t started yet but the bass were biting. I got this one to eat one of my deer hair poppers.Β GOPR3828.jpgIt’s really cool when they eat flies a tie myself. My deer hair poppers are pretty but I want something that will catch fish. I didn’t catch any sacalait, but I did hook this angry choupique on a 3 wt. For those of you who don’t know, a 3 wt. is like a very ultra light.GOPR3830.jpg
I can remember catching the heck out of those when I was a kid. I also remember that a friend of my mom’s used to tease her that eating them had some kind of relationship with fertility. There must be something to that…I’m the oldest of 6 children πŸ™‚
Plan C took me to an old reliable lake that’s owned by a former band parent. I found a couple bass that wanted to play.Β GOPR3826.jpgGOPR3824.jpg
They were both nice at 16 and 15 inches respectively. Notice that I went to my trusty crease-fly. Bass love ’em!!

Plan D took me to my cousin’s pond behind her house. I know there are bass there that will eat my flies but I also know we’ve caught sacalait there too. I didn’t think the sacalait would be spawning yet but I did bring my 3 wt. and some fluff butts. I ended up catching 3 bass, GOPR3832.jpglost a couple more….but….the sacalait came out to play πŸ™‚ I only kept 10 and released about 10 more. Only two of the ten were females so I guess these were males getting the beds ready for the females. I’ll save the big females for my cousin’s family πŸ™‚ By the way, I have to ask. “Does this stringer make my butt look big?”Β GOPR3841.jpg
Looks like we have a fish-for Mr. Vern this Friday πŸ™‚