Redefining the word, EPIC!

I find the word, epic, is over used by many people. We see it used to describe many things and in all types of media. I think I’ve even used it on a couple occasions to describe a few of my fly fishing trips. My son-in-law has been married to my daughter for over 3 years and he still hasn’t been on an off-shore fishing trip. This man, who loves my daughter and granddaughter unconditionally, has NEVER really been fishing! WHAT!!! Well that all changed this weekend. We had a truly epic trip!!

First of all, Nandi, is a “city boy,” born and raised in Houston, Texas. For probably five years now, we have been trying to show him some of our South Louisiana culture. He has eaten the food, danced at the fais do dos, and he has even caught a fish from a kayak, but I wanted to put him on some real fish from our coastal estuaries. IMG_1109.jpg

We went on a chartered trip with arguably the best captain in south Louisiana, Captain Chris Moran. I have fished with Chris once before (ten years ago) when we chartered him to do a senior fishing trip for my son, Dustin.P1181383.jpg There are only three guys in the picture, but I can tell you we had six fishermen on board and we were happy with the snapper, grouper and amberjack we caught that day. This weekend’s trip blew that one literally out the water. The morning began when we pulled up to a couple of rigs to catch mangrove snapper.

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Here is Nandi with one of the 60 nice mangrove snapper we landed that morning. After that, we targeted big red snapper in deep water. We quickly caught a two person limit (12 fish) and then headed toward a couple of shrimp boats we saw out there. Shrimp boats are usually a place you can stop to put a couple of tuna in the boat. I wanted to catch a few tuna and watch Nandi eat some fresh sushi on the boat. That didn’t happen because the tuna didn’t show up. However, the sharks were very thick (I’ll post a video soon). We didn’t stay long and decided to try to catch some grouper. Meanwhile, I put my fly rod together and passed the time catching hard tails on a streamer that I tied for the trip. Sorry…no picture. We caught one grouper a cobra and a sea bass when we noticed a line of seaweed in the distance. That is the tell-tale sign of the “rip,” an area of water where the somewhat dirty water mixes with the beautiful blue water that sits off the “shelf.” We motored slowly near the weeds lookin for dolphin. No… not bottle nosed dolphin, but dorado or Mahi Mahi.  I kept seeing some small ones but Chris would not stop. Finally, we got to the edge of the weed line and I saw a few more larger dolphin. He slowed the boat and I hooked up with a small almco jack. I released it and all hell broke loose as a school of nice dolphin showed up on the other side of the boat. I made a cast and hooked up on a leaping 24-inch dolphin. After putting that fish in the cooler, I managed to catch five more before Nandi hooked a very large wahoo. We cleared the lines and watched him fight a man-sized fish for a change. He landed a really nice one. I’ve never caught one myself 🙂

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After the rest of the boat caught a few more mahi mahi, two bull dolphin showed up. The captain went nuts and started ordering us around. We kept baiting up with live croakers and sure enough, Nandi hooked up on one. His drag was set too tight and Chris thought he would loose the fish. He ordered someone to take the rod from Nandi. It was OK, because Nandi really didn’t know what was going on anyway. We landed the two bulls and called it a day. Our tally for the day was a six-man limit of red snapper (probably averaging 15 pounds each), a six-man limit of mangrove snapper, a couple of small grouper, another type of snapper (I heard was really tasty), a sea bass, 3 big trigger fish, about 15 chicken dolphin (5 caught on my fly rod), two bull dolphin, a cobia, and a wahoo. THAT my friends is truly, an epic fishing day!IMG_2664.jpg
I wish I would have taken a few more snapshots of some of the fish. Here are couple. The first is a hard tail I caught and the second is one of the dolphin I caught. IMG_9246.JPGIMG_2653.jpg

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The first red snapper of the day…not caught on a fly rod 🙂

 

 

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Mission Six Does it Again

I had the privilege to fish the “Fishin’ for the Mission” again this year with my good friend and legend fly fisherman, Glen “Catch” Cormier. Mission Six is a nonprofit that supports veterans and first responders and lets them know we’ve got “their six.” They take vets out on the water to do some kayak fishing and then they get together to do some fellowship. All this provides therapy they all need. I was honored to be able to fish this tournament, which by the way, is the largest salt water fly fishing only tournament in Louisiana. The format is pretty simple. Teams of two (can be kayakers or motor boats) weigh their two heaviest slot redfish (between 16 and 27 inches). Last year, Catch and I won the tournament, beating out all kayakers and the big boats so there was some trash talk going on among some of the participants prior to this year’s event.

I was able to do some pre-fishing this year so I headed out (a little later that most fishermen would expect) on Saturday to see if I could spot some fish. The weather was forecast to be sunny with winds at 5-10 mph, perfect for sight-fishing! I launched at Eddies (Pointe aux Chenes) kayak marina. His setup is awesome! Fishermen are able to back their vehicle right up to the dock and slide their kayak out on the PVC pipe. The kayak slides surprisingly easy on it and then it’s just a matter of sliding the rig out in the little floating docks.IMG_2407.JPG  You can see from the picture that I was set up with my new Orion ice chest (more on that later). I paddled out past the statue that overlooks the marina and headed to to some the same spots where I caught the tournament winning fish last year. IMG_2409.JPG
I love the statue of Jesus overlooking all us boaters!

Anyway, the water was low and the visibility wasn’t prime. I guess it’s because the tournament was in June last year and we fished it nearly two months earlier this year. Add to that, Eddie, at the kayak launch said that this winter saw a fish kill and the fishing hasn’t recovered yet.  In spite of that, I was able to spot my first fish…uh, well,IMG_2410.JPG spook my first redfish, within five minutes of poling through the marsh so I was optimistic that I could put some fish in the boat. About an hour and a half later, I caught a nice redfish on my goto fly, the gold spoon fly. He was 23 inches but he was also quite lean. I knew that I would have to do better than that to win or even place in this year’s tournament, because the weather conditions were going to favor anyone who could sight fish. I caught a couple more pretty fish but nothing that I would consider to be a “money fish.” IMG_2412.JPGIMG_2413.JPG
The “Debbie Downer” of the day…poor Debbie; why did they choose her name? 🙂 was when I realized I had lost my landing net. I was push-poling my way down an opening in the march when I saw a net; my net floating by a nearby grassy island. The wind had picked up by now and I assumed that it got lodged out of my rod holder behind my new ice chest and I never heard it hit the water. Good thing it floats. Right? Well, I retrieve it and went to put it back in the rod holder in the back of my ice chest. IMG_2407 3.jpgNotice where the rod holders are. I had to reach way back behind me to adjust the rod holder. When I did that, I stuck my head a bit too far over the edge of the kayak and splash. I hit the water! I quickly sunk in the soft Point aux Chenes muck and proceeded to lose my shoes somewhere three feet below the “marsh bottom.” The ice chest fell out of the kayak and my immediate reaction was, “Oh no! Not my expensive fly rod!” I was fortunate that nothing was broken. So I stood in the water and put everything back in the kayak before I climbed back in. Well as soon as I tried to climb back in, the top heavy ice chest (that wasn’t latched to the kayak) fell out of the kayak a second time and of course, I lost my balance again and I ended up in the marsh water a second time. This time, I actually stepped on my landing net and sunk IT into the muck. I was extremely tired and weak after this second attempt to re-enter my kayak. It would take me two more attempts before I was able to get myself, all my rods, my box of flies, and my ice chest back on board. I ended up walking the kayak to some marsh grass and I stuck the bow of the yak into some grass to stabilize it.

I was exhausted so I called it a day. I figured I paddled 5 miles or so and I needed food, hydration, and rest. Sunday would be a different day.

I arrived at 5:30 AM for the captain’s meeting. I guess we ended up launching around 6 AM and were greeted to a splendid sunrise with calm winds. I followed Catch out to a spot he had scouted that had a lot of grass and clear water. We began the morning with poppers. I haven’t caught a redfish on a popper in years. I’ve had a few blowups but I’ve not been successful in landing one. Sunday would not be a day to break my popper drought. I did have one nice redfish rise up from the grass and raise its back out of the water to stare, eye-to-eye with my popper. I don’t know how to explain it…weird, fun, heartbreaking, exhilarating…words cannot describe it. Well after a couple seconds of staring at my popper, I decided that if I made it MOVE, the redfish would think it was alive and would try to eat it. Boy, was I wrong! It spooked and high-tailed it out of there. The good news was, I saw Catch and he said he had missed four on a popper and had just landed a keeper slot fish on a spoon fly.

I decided to work some of the area I had scouted the day before. 9 o’clock came by. Still no fish. 10 o’clock…still no fish. Now I was seeing fish, only they were extremely spooky and even those I had managed to cast to didn’t want anything to do with a spoon fly, a popper, or anything else I tried to get them to eat. 11 o’clock…still nothing. There was so much baitfish (mullet) in the area, it was hard to tell if the splashing sounds I was hearing was mullet or redfish. I heard one particularly loud splash and when I investigated, I saw a very large, upper slot redfish slowly chasing bait over a grass bed. The good news was, it was moving away from me so I had a chance of not spooking it. I crept up ever so slowly to it and put a couple casts in its vicinity. It too, didn’t want anything to do with my spoon fly. I was relentless. I put the fly about 12 inches out in front of it and this time it pounced. I set the hook home and hung on. Immediately, the fish took off like a bat out of hell, getting me down almost to my backing. I started to gain on the fish and I was thinking…MONEY FISH!! Then, it spit the hook back at me.  With the luck I was having that day, I can tell you I really wasn’t really surprised.

Anyway, about an hour later, I did manage to land my only redfish of the day. GOPR3871.jpg
It was about 21 inches and I knew I had to do better. After a quick call to Catch, who had already landed 6, I decided to try to find him. Come to find out, he was deep in the marsh but he found some clean water and there were plenty redfish in it! I did manage to spook a bunch more fish and even hook into another upper slot redfish but I lost it too. At 2 o’clock, I decided to call it a day. I knew Catch had caught a dozen redfish and had kept his four largest, which were larger than mine. Oh, and did I mention that I left all my water and Gatorade IN THE TRUCK!! I decided to start sucking on ice chips in my ice chest. I know, you’re thinking NOT THE FISH ICE. No, I kept the fish on a stringer until I decided to paddle back.

I got back to the landing, chugged two 32 oz. bottles of Gatorade and looked for Catch. He wasn’t in yet. It was 2:35 and the scales closed at 3. I called him and he said, “Oh no. I’m lost. What time is it?” Good thing he found his way back. We were about to send a few guys out to find him. AND he got back at 2:58. He had our two largest fish so I let him do the honors. His two largest fish earned us a third place finish overall. In fact, his big fish weighed over 8 pounds! We won some cash (I don’t know how much because we donated it back to Mission Six again this year) and we each got a fifth of Tito’s Vodka. We kept the vodka 🙂

I know this is a long read, but it was fun. I hope it makes you feel like you were there with me. Here are a couple pictures to close out this entry. I have to say that it’s an honor to fish this tournament. I do NOT fish tournaments (except for the BCKFC Fish Pics year-long tournament), but I will fish this one again next year. The people are great and it’s great to see the faces of the veterans who made the trip down there. We are so very grateful for their service and their sacrifice. It’s an honor to fish with them and to hang out with them for an afternoon. I hope to be able to spend time on the water with some of them in the future.

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I Love it when they eat what I tie!

I finally finished up with school for a couple of days (I take my band to Disney World next week, so I decided to do an Andry Good Friday tradition and do a little fresh water fishing. I had a couple flies that I wanted to try out so I made a trip to my wrist doctor’s lake for a little “research and development.”

First up on my fly rod was a new variant on my crease fly. It was tied on a barbless hook that a colleague had given me. After missing three fish early on, I decided to ditch it and go with fly number 2. Fly number 2 is a frog pattern that I’ve been tying with dyed deer hair.IMG_2203.jpg
Here’s my weedless version with Cohen’s frog legs. The one I used this morning was one that I still had tied on my rod from my CENLA trip. It’s basically the same frog but the legs are just a bunch of rubber skirt legs.

Anyway, I got a big blowup on the frog right away but I missed it too, so it was bass – 4, Doc – 0. By now the wind was starting to pick up. We had a beautiful blue bird morning after yesterday’s rain and cool front passed through and even though I wasn’t catching fish, I was relishing the beautiful weather. I figured I had better paddle to the back of the lake where I could get some protection from the wind by the tree line. On my very first cast, I got this big girl to inhale my frog! She, like most of the big bass I’ve caught throughout my life, just dug in deep and never jumped. That was a blessing because she was barely hooked in the top of her mouth.GOPR3846.jpg
Although she measured a little over 18 inches, she is probably my personal best by weight. I didn’t want to stress her by digging for my scale but I estimate she weighed over 5 pounds. As I’m writing this, I’m looking on my wall where I have my personal best (8 lbs) mounted, which was caught on a craw worm in a kayak that I made many years ago. Today’s fish was definitely over 5!

Anyway, the fish acted like they were eating frogs today. I actually caught the same fish twice within 5 minutes of it’s initial release. I know many of you would say that wasn’t possible and no, I don’t have a picture of it, but it had a very unique stress mark on its right side, and a flesh wound on its belly. When I caught the same fish 5 minutes later, it had the same two marks on it.

I ended up catching 7 this morning and only two of those were under 15 inches! GOPR3849.jpg
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Most of them inhaled may frog!IMG_2291.JPG

After 7 bass on that one frog, I needed to retie because the tippet had gotten tangled and was digging into the hair. I’ll do a little trimming on it and put it back into service soon. I did try a crawfish imitation that I tied last winter but I didn’t get any looks from the fish.

Now, another Good Friday tradition…eat some fish. I plan on pulling out a pack of sacalait out the freezer for tonight’s dinner. Happy Easter to everyone.

Spring trip to CENLA

Spring trip to CENLA

Although it isn’t officially spring yet, I’ve been itching to make the 3 hour drive north to my buddy’s house in central Louisiana (CENLA) to do some bass, crappie, bluegill, red-ear sunfish…and whatever else would bite on a fly rod trip. I left Baton Rouge right after school and met Catch at the launch site to fish Lake Valentine. For about an hour-and-a-half, we fished the clear water in the lake and I actually skunked. I was fishing a new frog pattern (see my previous post) and I couldn’t get a bite. Catch, however caught a half dozen or so bass and had this nice one that he caught on a small, dark green popper.IMG_2207.jpg

Then next day, we got up early and headed over to the same lake to try the morning bite. I managed a couple of dinks but nothing substantial. Catch had similar luck and by 10:30 or so, we decided to call it a morning, regroup, and try “plan B.” The wind had picked up substantially and the fish just weren’t cooperating. What a difference 12 hours makes! We were treated to some beautify wildlife, including this friendly little guy.IMG_2256.jpg

Anyway, plan B was to fish another local lake for some coveted crappie, (also know as sacalait or white perch). I have a friend who’s dad is getting up in age and I promised him some fish for a fry. He loves sacalait too! We probably arrived at Fullerton Lake around 2 PM and fished until sunset. Catch started catching bass right off the bat. I wanted to target sacalait so our strategies differed. He was fishing with poppers while I fished mostly a fluff butt (actually a “silly” butt). I wasn’t having any luck with the sacalait but I did catch two bull bream over 8 inches. I paddled over to Catch to see what he was doing and he said he had caught and released about a dozen small bass. The bass in Fullerton aren’t as big as those in Valentine. Fullerton is loaded with downed trees and logs and makes a perfect habitat for the coveted panfish. We, however, had missed the major spawning period for the crappie and reports hadn’t been that good. I did manage to catch two really nice ones (14 and 15 inches). When I added those to the bream and the one sacalait that Catch caught, we ended up with a nice stringer of 9 bull bream and three sacalait. I caught 4 bass on poppers and Catch caught 21. I was disappointed that I didn’t get any strikes on my deer hair frog. I downsized my popper and that’s when I began to catch some bass. On a side note, I don’t think I can recall ever fishing in a place that had so many BULL FROGS. They were croaking all afternoon. I even saw several in the grass along the banks. I tried to get a picture but I spooked the one that I was able to get close to. Here are a few pictures from the day.

IMG_2258.jpgThat’s a 15-inch slab!
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A chunky bass caught on the fly rod in Lake Valentine Saturday morning.

I did manage to get some pictures of Catch casting from his kayak.
Hee is a series of pictures I took. He makes it look effortless.

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My First Report of the New Year!

My first blog entry for 2018 is…well…not a fishing report. What?

For years now, my son, Dustin, has been kidding me, asking, “Why in the world would anyone go fishing during hunting season?” Well, after putting my waders and shotgun up for, say 10 years, I decided it was time to spend some quality time with my son on the water.

Dustin has really been doing well the past two weekends and texted me Saturday that they had each shot a limit of nice puddle ducks that morning. After a full day of work for me (all music related), I decided to make the hour and a half drive to the camp to join him and one of his hunting buddies. This hunting camp is really nice and the wildlife décor really got me fired up to get out and shoot a few birds.

IMG_2072.JPGTo be honest though, I was secretly hoping that I would shoot well. I haven’t popped a cap in a long time. Was I going to embarrass myself among those “20-something-year-olds?”

To get to the blind, we mounted four-wheelers and made the ten-minute ride to the edge of the flooded timber and hard bottoms. The morning temperature dipped below 20 degrees so that ride, even though a slow one, was a very cold one. From there, we waded about another ten minutes through thigh-deep frigid water to get to the blind. I was really glad to be able to borrow a pair in insulated chest waders because we were breaking ice nearly the whole way until we got to the open water where the blind and decoys were. We got situated and were treated to a gorgeous sunrise.IMG_2075.JPG

The second reason I wanted to make a hunt with Dustin was to watch his three-year-old lab, Duke, work. Duke is a “cracker jack” retriever who absolutely LOVES to hunt. Here are a couple pictures of him “on point” as we positions himself on the ramp and eagerly awaits one of us to put a bird on the water.IMG_2077.JPGIMG_2093.JPG

Right at daybreak, we had some birds buzz us but we didn’t get a shot off. We nearly pulled the trigger on a drake spoonbill, but we thought we would experience the kind of morning that they had the day before. About five minutes later, we had a group of diving ducks buzz and I connected on my first shot. I was happy to know I could still shoot 🙂

Insert sound of crickets chirping here!

Well it took us a while before we were given an opportunity to pull the trigger again. We knocked down the first of two gadwalls and Duke made a great retrieve on both of them. I took my cell phone out to get a picture of him in action but the cold weather caused my battery to freeze up and I lost power for about 15 minutes until I could get the phone warmed up again. I did get a picture of half our decoy spreadIMG_2078.JPGIf I was a duck, I would sure want to land there. Anyway we didn’t do too bad for a slow day. We finished with six ducks between three of us. We winged a couple more that even Duke couldn’t catch up to. Did I say it was cold?IMG_2095.JPGThis hat and several layers of clothing were key! We were even able to fry up some deer sausage for breakfast.IMG_2094.JPG

I really enjoyed spending time with my son, doing one of the things he loves best. I won’t wait so long to go back with him. For now, I’ll leave you with some more pictures from the morning and I promise my next entry will be a FISHING story.IMG_2086.jpgGreen wing tealIMG_2083.JPGGadwall (grey duck)IMG_2046.jpgPintail (from a previous hunt but oh so pretty)

A Chance to Even the Score

Last Saturday, I had the chance to fish with a buddy of mine and while he caught a lot of fish, I didn’t. I jokingly wrote…Redish 20, Doc 2 in my latest blog post. Catch Cormier told me later, “sounds like you had more blown chances than LSU did when they played Alabama.” Well that just didn’t sit right with me, so I was determined to get back out there and even the score up a bit.

My lovely wife decided to travel to Houston to visit my daughter, her husband, and my beautiful granddaughter without me and that left my Saturday free to either do some fishing, cut grass, rake leaves, or watch LSU beat up on Arkansas at 11 AM. Uhh…you can guess what I chose 🙂  The all important forecast called for sunny skies, which is perfect for sight fishing, but windy. Now, it looked like the wind would be stronger the further south I went. During the week, I texted Drew and asked his opinion, because he fished down there for three days, and he said the fish were thicker further down south. I figured that because of the warm fall we’ve had, the speckled trout haven’t moved as far inside the marsh yet. So my plan was to head further south than I had fished last weekend. On Saturday mornings, I listen to Don Dubuc’s radio show http://www.dontheoutdoorsguy.com for the day’s fishing reports from local guides around south Louisiana. They all complained about the wind and dirty water that the front had brought in. One even said he had cancelled his plans for the day (he flies a sea plane to the Chandelier Islands). Add to that, the coastal duck season opened that morning and I found myself in a pickle. I had already driven an hour from home and I could either turn around or keep going. A very wise person once said, and it’s been quoted by many fishermen, “You can’t catch fish while laying on your couch watching football!”  So I keep on driving south. I did, however alter my plan to fish closer to Grand Isle and hoped the wind wouldn’t be so strong  in Leeville.

After making my combat launch, I paddled a couple hundred yards and started throwing a pink Charlie under a VOSI. About the third cast into the morning I caught my first trout. Nice…but it was about 11 inches. I stayed in that spot for about 20 minutes and continued to catch trout but all were between 10-11 inches. GOPR3725.JPGGOPR3720.JPGI told myself that there were bigger fish out there so I headed out to a couple more trout spots I like to fish this time of year. I was able to catch trout at several locations, but they were all clones of each other. Now, catching is fun, so I continued to play around with the trout until I was sure the hunters were finished for the morning. Oh, and for those of you who may be concerned, I also planned on staying far away from their lease. I know they get pretty angry this time of year when people stray on their duck leases and disturb the birds. I lost count at around 26 trout and only about three of them touched the 12 inch mark, so I decided not to keep any trout unless I caught some around 14 inches or so.

Well, around 10:30 or so, I decided to head out in search of redfish. The wind had picked up considerably, but I figured I could find some leeward banks to do some sight fishing. The sun was in my favor but the wind and dirty water made things very tough. I didn’t even see my first redfish until probably 11:30 or so and I wasn’t even able to make a cast before it darted away. It wasn’t until about noon that I had my first redfish eat. I saw a descent sized slot redfish in a small pond but I lost sight of him when all the mullet and sheepshead started darting around and muddied the water even more. I was determined, so I put a couple casts where I figured it was and bam, I was hooked up. I learned my lessons from last week and didn’t try to horse it in too quickly. Five minutes later, I eased a nice 24-inche redfish into my landing net.

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I started seeing more redfish but because of the windy, muddy, conditions, I was doing more spooking and wouldn’t see a fish until it was only several feet from my kayak. At that point, I couldn’t get a cast off without spooking it. I even tried letting the wind take me away from the cruising fish but that didn’t work either. My second redfish was an upper slot fish that I saw cruising another little pond and I was in luck because it didn’t see me. I put a descent cast on it (remember the wind is now blowing 10-15 mph) and I got a textbook eat. I strip set the hook on it and thought, “boy I’m not going to have as many missed opportunities this week” Just then, the redfish decided to strip line out and head toward a very small cut in the back of the pond. I knew that would mean trouble so I tried to put some pressure on it to turn it and it broke my tippet. 😦  Upon inspection of my tippet, I saw that the line had become frayed. I probably should have inspected it after landing my last redfish. I noticed that the previous fish had nearly swallowed the fly and its gills and crushers had probably done a good job of fraying the line. The problem was, that was the last fly like that in my box. I tied it to try to mimic the fly that Drew had used last week. PB100001.JPG

I tied on a similar pattern but discarded it because it was too light and there was no casting it in the steady wind I was fishing. I ended with a fly version of the LSU chub, a purple and chartreuse fly with medium barbell eyes. It was a bit heavy for the shallow water I was fishing but I figured it was my best option. My next redfish was my biggest of the day at 26.5 inches. That would have been a great tournament fish.GOPR3730.jpgGOPR3731.JPG

I only keep tournament fish when I’m fishing a tournament and that one was released back in the water.GOPR3732.jpg

I did manage to catch another good-eating sized fish at 22 inches so this one got released into my ice chest. I have been trading fish fillets for fresh farm eggs with one of my colleagues at work. 🙂GOPR3735.JPG
THAT’S MY LSU CHUB IMITATION IN ITS MOUTH

I ended the day trying to see if the trout had grown since the morning but all I could find were a few more 11-inch fish. I called it a day after landing 3 redfish and 26 speckled trout. PB110005.jpg
I THINK THE EYES ON A REDFISH ARE ABSOLUTELY BEAUTIFIUL
PB110003.JPGTHE SCALE PATTERN IS PRETTY NEAT TOO.

 

In-creasing your odds

I was recently featured in an article in the Louisiana Sportsman Magazine about the popularity of the crease fly. This fly has been my “GO-TO” fly the past year-and-a-half and I’ve caught over 100 bass on it in a year. The really cool part is, I don’t like spending money on a lot of flies. This fly is:

  • Durable – I haven’t kept count, but I’ve been able to catch 30 or so more bass on a single fly as long as a big one doesn’t break me off 🙂
  • Inexpensive to make – Hobby Lobby is my friend!
  • Quick and easy to make – Here goes

First, let me write this disclaimer. I did not invent this fly, so it’s not mine. I actually have to give most of the credit to Bill Laminack for showing me how he tied his and for turning me on to the beauty and simplicity of Lame

Materials list:

  • Gamakatsu B10S (stinger) hook in a size 2
    Thread (any color will do)
    The thin white craft foam with peel back sticky side (I measured mine and it was about 16th inch. It’s probably labeled in mm in the stores)
    The next size up craft foam (1/8 in)
    Craft fur (or buck tail)
    Pearl Lame (to imitate baitfish scales)
    Super glue (thin and gel)
    Mirage stick-on eyes (easy peel 7/72″)
    Permanent markers to color your fly
    Your finish of choice (Sally Hansens, epoxy, delta satin varnish)
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Step 1 – lay down a thread base, tie in a small amount of craft foam (or buck tail)  and secure with thin super glue. You don’t want the foam to spin around the hook when the big bass eat. If you don’t have thin super glue, you can use Sally Hansen’s Hard as Nails.
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Step 2 – tie in about a 1/2 by 1/4 in piece of the thicker foam to the front of the hook. I believe this serves two purposes. It gives the finished foam more surface area to adhere to and it helps to make the front of the popper more buoyant. Whip finish and cut your thread. That’s all the tying you will need to do.IMG_0999
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Nothing Pretty Here. Doesn’t Need to Be!

Step 3 – I created a teardrop shaped templet out of card-stock to create the body of the foam fly. Trim the foam to the dimensions of the templet and remove the backing paper. Firmly adhere a piece of Lame and trim.
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Step 4 – fold the foam in have and cut a small piece off the tail to allow the tail material to pass freely.
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You Can See How This Material Imitates the Scale Pattern of Baitfish

Step 5 – carefully superglue the foam body over the hook to form your crease fly. It is important NOT to put too much glue or your foam will not stick and you will end up with a mess and probably glue your fingers to the fly. 🙂

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If you have trouble getting the foam to stick you can try using some mini clamps. (did I tell you that Harbor Freight is my friend too?)
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Step 6 – use a bodkin to apply stick on eyes, use a marker to color them up, and seal it with several coats of your favorite finishing product, being sure to coat it where the lame meets the foam.IMG_1008.JPG
IMG_1009.JPGI find that Sally Hansens is durable enough to do this with several applications but if you want to really break a record, by all means use epoxy, a very strong tippet, and this may be the last fly you’ll ever need.  AND you’ll catch hundreds of these. GOPR3548.jpg

IMG_1012.JPG           Here’s my saltwater version, jointed and measures 4 inches from tip to tail.