Summer Bassin’

Now that school is officially out, I thought I’d have some time to do some fishing and head down to the coast to target a species that I haven’t had a chance to target yet…the speckled trout. Yep. When I look at what I’ve caught this year, it shows I’ve caught only 4 redfish, no trout, but a ton of bass. That’s because whenever my schedule does allow me to fish, the weather does not. I’ve been off this week and the winds have been blowing 10-15 mph all week long. I’m thinking I may have to say, “damned the torpedos!” and head to the marsh anyway.

No more venting here though. This is my fishing blog and I will conform and write about my last two or so trips. One of my friends had me over and told me they will be selling their home, complete with acreage and a small pond that has provided me with lots of fun mornings and late afternoons chasing small bass and nice bream. I decided to give it a shot one last time and I was rewarded with a nice mess of bream for the fryer. The bream didn’t bite until around 7 PM, but they were smacking a small popper in some moving water and I was able to put about 20 of them on a stringer before the mosquitos ran me off the water. I told my dad he would be so happy with me. He grew up in the Great Depression and he cannot stand to see anything go to waste. He cannot understand why I would spend a morning fishing and not keep any of the fish I catch 🙂 I Told him that the thrill for me is to catch them on flies I tie myself and I have a freezer full of bream, sacalait, redfish, tuna, and snapper. I don’t need to keep any more. I mostly practice “catch and release” these days. However, when I get on a good bream bite and most of them are between 7 and 9 inches long, I practice catch and release all right…release them into a hot skillet of grease 🙂 So, I kept eight for myself and I vacuum-sealed the rest for my buddy and his wife to enjoy. IMG_2469.jpg

I mentioned earlier that I’ve caught a ton of bass this spring. I made it out to my neighborhood lake and my doctor friend’s lake and caught 10 on frog poppers and shad flies. I find that I loose as many as I land, though, and it gets a bit frustrating. I think I have good hook sets but somehow, when the fish changes direction, it spits the hook. I’ve tried setting the hook harder but even then, I find I’ve pulled the hook right out of the fish’s mouth. I’m using sharp Gamakatsu hooks too. I guess it’s part of the game. A couple trips ago I had another friend and his wife fish the same lake with conventional tackle. I easily outfitted them 2 to 1, so I guess I’m not complaining 🙂

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When I haven’t been fishing, I’ve been preparing for my various summer band camps that I will teach and a deer fly tying class as well. That had led me to refine my tying skills and experiment with new patterns. One of my latest is this baby duck. While I know that bass are opportunistic and will eat anything that looks like food, this baby is going to go under glass somewhere and sit on a mantle. IMG_2481.jpg
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Here’s a commission job I did as well.

One more thing. Many people look at these flies and wonder about durability and fishability. I think the pictures of the bass speak for themselves about the fishability. As for the durability, I find that they hold up pretty well. Here’s a frog fly that I used during a recent trip. I landed 8 bass and probably lost at least as many. It did get messed up and the bass had knocked both eyes out of their sockets.

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Glue and eyes are cheap, so guess what? I think it’s going to catch another 8 or so before I have to retire it.

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One more trip before he gets married.

“This morning was just what I needed. I was determined to experience that “thrill.”  My adversary, the poisson rouge, is a very worthy opponent. This apex predator of the shallows feeds on shrimp, small crabs and unsuspecting baitfish in our vast Louisiana marsh. The “thrill” is to be able to push pole my way through the marsh among ducks, shorebirds, otters, and nutria while I look for signs of my adversary. Sometimes it’s as subtle as shrimp making a dash as they try to elude that king predator. Sometimes it’s just a dark shadow that looks out of place in the shallow water among the clumps of oysters. Other times, it’s being able to actually spot the pumpkin-colored mass of gills and scales before it spots me. To be able to sneak up on this predator without being noticed, cast a fly about the size of my fingernail to it, and then watch it turn and eat it is the “thrill” I seek. Nothing else in sport makes my heartbeat rush or causes my knees to shake like the moment I put that fly six inches in front of a redfish and watch him eat.” That was taken from a post from earlier this year…much earlier. In fact I caught 9 redfish that day down in Southeast Louisiana and I haven’t had a day like that in quite a while until today. I was able to hook up with my son’s best buddy, Austin, one last time before he gets married in December. In fact, he’s a lot like my own son. The difference lies here. My son likes to fish, but he LOVES to hunt. Austin likes to hunt but absolutely LOVES to fish! AND to top that off, I turned him on to fly fishing a couple of years ago and he’s been chomping at the bit for me to take him to some of my spots off LA 1. I even taught him to tie a few flies and he tied a couple of my new purple flies that he calls, “the Purple Assault.”

Someone wrote that his favorite month to fish the Louisiana marsh was November. We actually have moderate weather and you can find times when the wind blows 5-10 mph with sunny skies. That’s perfect for sightfishing redfish in the marsh. We did have one of those big storms blow in for the weekend, which made it impossible to fish (even the big bay boats and fishing guides couldn’t get out on the water). Austin and I planned to leave Baton Rouge around noon to do some fishing Monday afternoon and then fish all day Tuesday. We actually left later than I had hoped but we did manage to get on the water and fish for an hour and a half. I wanted to try a spot another buddy had told me about for speckled trout. The trout bite wasn’t on but I was able to hook this tournament worthy 26-inch redfish that must have weighed 8 pounds or so. Sorry, no picture 😦

We woke up early Tuesday morning and headed to one of my redfish spots where I had taken Austin two years ago. On that trip, he caught his first redfish on a fly rod. Today his goal was to catch a five-fish limit…on his fly rod…on the purple assault! (see my post on the evolution of a fly )

Five minutes into our entrance into the marsh, Austin caught his first redfish…and then another. I finally got into the action and by the time the sun came up, I was seeing lots of redfish. Austin and I each had one redfish break our tippet, but for the most part, the redfish weren’t getting the best of us. Sure, we had the usual missed strikes and spooked fish but for the most part, if the fish ate the fly, it made it to the landing net…or Austin’s hand (he forgot his landing net at home). I ended the day with 11 redfish and Austin probably caught 7 or 8. Most of them were in the 18-20 inch range so we kept a few fish for the grill. It was a great day to be on the water with a great friend. I’ll let these pictures speak for themselves.

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Austin’s first redfish
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A pretty release.

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Sunny skies and low winds made it easier to spot these guys. The water clarity wasn’t very good because of the constant strong winds these past two days. It resulted in a lighter colored fish. None of our fish had that “pumpkin” color. I guess I’ll have to get my pumpkin on Thanksgiving 🙂

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Another redfish for Austin. GOPR3795.jpgGOPR3804.jpg
It went on like this throughout the day. By 11 AM, there were redfish in nearly every cut gorging themselves on tiny shrimp. I love the action that rabbit zonked has in the water.
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I thought this picture was cool, with Austin in the background.GOPR3817.jpg
The purple assault did its thing!
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Say ahhhh…Happy Thanksgiving!!

 

 

 

Happy New Year!

Happy 2017 to you. The end of 2017 went out with a bang as I became a proud grandpa. Hudson Victoria was born December 22. She’s already working on her “Heisman” pose.

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I can’t wait until I can get that cutie in a kayak!

Anyway, this is a fishing blog so I’ve got to get to the fishing. 🙂

I’ve been kind of land locked since Thanksgiving. I did manage a couple of nice bass in the lakes by my daughter’s house in Texas between Christmas and New Year’s. I haven’t been able to time my days off with the good weather. I have, however, been able to sneak out for a couple morning and afternoon trips to my neighborhood lake to try a few new flies that I’ve tied. The bream have been cooperating. In fact, I kept a couple that were over 8.5 inches this afternoon to put in a frying skillet. These guys were caught on a fluff butt on my 3 wt. Lots of fun! I actually caught 2 dozen or more in an hour and a half. IMG_0588.jpg

I also managed to land two chunky bass too. IMG_0587.JPG

The water has been warm and these guys fought hard.

I have plans to put some fly tying tutorials on my blog in 2017, so stay tuned for that. In the meantime, I haven’t decided if I’m going to try to do my species challenge this year or just keep up with my numbers of bass, speckled trout, and redfish caught liked I’ve done for the past two years. Let me know in the comments below what you think. Here are some of what I’ve been tying the past few months.crease flies.JPGThese crease flies (poppers) were killer on the bass last year. I probably caught around 100 on these alone. IMG_3200.JPGThe next deadly fly for bass was my frog popper. I also tried one of those double barrel flies.IMG_0589.JPG
Here, I’ve tied a couple versions of the now infamous mop flies.IMG_0592.JPGIMG_0594.JPG

And a few round dinnys. IMG_3060.jpg

I’ve also been playing around with a few of these: (Looper Spineless Minnow) and I’m trying my hand at deer-hair poppers. I’ll post a few pictures of those when I finally get something that looks presentable 🙂