Just because it looks like it will catch fish…

As a fly fisherman and someone who loves the challenge and thrill of catching fish on flies that I tie myself, I am always looking for new fly patterns, new color combinations, and new materials to tie. I recently stumbled on some beautiful flies on social media that were tied using craft foam. These were basically crease flies but crease flies on “steroids.” I have tied crease flies in the past and I had some success catching fish on them, but I found my hookup ratios weren’t as good as those on deer hair poppers and divers. After seeing these beautiful I thought I would tie a few of these up myself. These are ties by Carl Harris (you can find his work on facebook). I think he ties these in size 5, probably for big pike, so I wanted to tie a few in a size 2 for bass. Another motive I had for trying to tie these was to be able to teach an easy pattern to my high school fly tiers next year. They looked pretty easy enough. πŸ™‚

Well, I came up with these.

Boy, they sure look pretty, don’t they? Well, it was time to do some “research” in my neighborhood lake. I got up early this morning and put my kayak in our upper lake. I was fishing with the shad colored one and I got an early blowup before the sun had even come up. My first missed fish. About 15 minutes later, and I missed another fish on the popper. I also had a lot of small bream that snapped and missed my fly. No worries because they were my target fish anyway. This pattern of missed fish continued until I had missed four bass. Well that was enough “research” for me. I cut my foam imitation off and tied on one of my deer hair bugs. In a hurry, I didn’t tie a good knot. About four or five casts with that diver, I had a big blowup. My hook found its mark and I had a nice bass on for about 3 seconds when it popped my leader. Had tied a bad knot, but luckily, the fish spit my dahlberg diver out and it was floating about three feet from where I had lost the fish. I quickly retied, making sure to secure my knot well. Ten minutes later, I had a big bass roll on the bug but it didn’t eat it. Two casts later, its little brother couldn’t resist and I landed a feisty little largemouth bass.

I was back at my house before 8 AM and I had to do some thinking about those foam flies. First of all, I realized my hook gap wasn’t wide enough.

Notice how high the eye of the hook is. That’s no good. There isn’t enough hook gap on this fly

I actually threw that fly in the garbage and I decided to widen the hook gaps on the other flies I had tied.

While the eye of this hook is still too much in the middle of the fly, I was able to slightly widen the hook gap.

So, now I have to do some more research. My goal is to come up with an easy pattern for my club members to tie with inexpensive foam they can purchase at a local hobby store. I’ll do some tweaking, some more research, and I’ll post my results here. Research is fun!!

Tight loops and tight lines.

Memorial Day Bass

The beginning of summer marks a time for me to get as much fishing in as I can. I do have to balance family, and prep work for upcoming camps, but after a rough week, I was looking forward to the peaceful tranquility… wait a minute…who am I trying to fool. I was looking forward to feeling the tug of a chunky fish on my 6 wt!

I arose early Sunday morning and headed to my “go to” lake. It was a beautiful morning with an early foggy mist on the water. The unusually cool morning temperature of 64 degrees was cooler than the temperature of the water so visibility on the water was actually limited early. It didn’t take long for that fog to lift and when it did, that’s when I got my first explosion on one of my crawfish colored deer hair poppers.

This early morning bass sucked in my crawfish colored deer hair popper.

By 6 AM, I was lipping my third bass of the morning.

You should be able to see the crawfish popper imitation in this photo. You can also see the fog is beginning to lift.

Another chunky bass on the crawfish imitation

You can barely see the popper deep inside this bucket mouth.

I have to keep reminding myself to check my tippet though. After battling several fish, my tippet gets frayed and I usually loose fish…and my popper 😦 Yes, after landing my first 5 fish, I had one break me off. What a bummer, because I think that’s my last crawfish imitation popper. Luckily, I know how to tie more πŸ™‚ The sun was coming up pretty fast now and I thought I’d stick to my crawfish theme. I found a diver in my box that had an orange belly, so I tied it on and tried my luck. I was treated to a sight I don’t see very often. I watched about a 2 lb bass go completely airborne after a dragonfly by the tall Johnson grass near the bank. I quickly tossed my newly tied deer hair bug but I didn’t get any hits. By now it was after 7 AM and the bass seemed to be leaving the shallows for deeper water. I had a choice to make. Either stick with my topwater approach or try a subsurface fly. Topwater is always more fun, so I decided to keep on keeping on.

When people ask me about strategy for targeting bass on a fly rod, I often use a baseball analogy. I can hit anything a pitcher throws at me as long as I know two things…when it’s going to get here, and where is it going to be. The same thing applies to fly fishing. I can catch ’em if I know when they will be there (very early in the morning or very late) and where they will be (within 10 feet of the bank). That’s where the fly fisherman has the advantage. Once I clear the first 10 feet of the bank, I can just lift my fly up and put it back within a second. There’s no need to reel in all my line and cast again like you would with a bait caster. That means, I can keep my bug in the sweet spot a lot longer with poppers on a fly rod than I could with traditional tackle. So, did my theory work? You bet it did. I was able to entice a few more to eat my offering before about 8 AM, by which time, the bite had just about shut down. I did try a subsurface fly, but I didn’t get a bite. No worries, because it was starting to get hot and I had had enough for one morning (I landed 9 bass)

I do get to meditate while on the water and I thought about a dear friend who lost his two-year battle with cancer this past week. This trip was for you, Ronnie! I also thought about the true meaning of the Memorial Day Holiday. I am thankful for all those who gave the ultimate sacrifice so we can live here and enjoy the bounty that our Lord has bestowed on us. Happy Memorial Day to all of you.

My Memorial Day photo (I nearly always bring my flag with me)

Here’s a good picture with that Dalberg Diver (with the orange belly)

School’s Almost Out for Summer

For many, there are four hallowed words that are heralded around the country by students and teachers alike. “School’s out for summer!” Well, it’s almost out for me. I have had several spring concerts, convocations, baccalaureate Masses, graduation performances, but as I check each one off the list and the list gets shorter, I find I’m more able to get my fly rod out and hit the local neighborhood lakes for some relaxation and some, hopefully, fishing action. I have even flirted with the opportunity to head south to do some sight fishing for redfish, but the conditions have to be perfect for me to warrant spending $60 on gas just to get there and back. Call me cheap, but my daddy raised a frugal man.

Anyway, the fishing in my neighborhood lakes have been hit or miss. I have had some hits like this.

I had a good morning a week ago and caught these two slabs on a fluff butt.

Some misses, (no pictures of misses of course) and what I call a grand slam…landing four species in one morning; a bass, several sacalait, bluegill, and even a spotted garfish.

An early morning 3 pound plus bass on the musicdoc shad fly

Crappie on the music doc shad fly

A bluegill on a fluff butt

And even one of these prehistoric-looking guys full of sharp teeth.

That garfish ate my shad imitation and when I released it, it reared back and its teeth sunk into my pants leg. Thank God I was wearing long pants or I would be wearing battle scars from that encounter.

By the way, I think that big crappie (aka sacalait) was probably my personal best at 15.34 inches

That’s probably my personal best sacalait.

Of course, now that school is nearly over, you can bet the weather will be ugly. The winds will blow 15-20 and there will be lots of clouds and thunderstorms. Oh, well. I certainly will make the best of it. I want to do a float trip for some spotted bass and I’d like to try some small stream fishing in the Florida parishes. Too much rain may put a damper on that though. I’ll post reports if I do though.

Tight loops and tight lines. And happy summer!

I’ve been searching and searching…and then I found you :)

I have been trying to find a consistent sacalait bite in our neighborhood lake all spring, but I have fallen short on several occasions. Then there were other obligations like school, family, and weather events. So, I don’t post the trips when I go out and I skunk (rarely happens) or I only catch a few bluegill or a bass or two. I guess I need to post those reports too, so I look human πŸ™‚ However, I took the opportunity to walk my kayak over to the neighborhood lake this afternoon after chores (repairs to the chlorinator) and supper and fish for an hour.

I met a young man and his dad at my “put in” spot and we struck up a conversation. I watched him (a 5th grader) reel in a small bass on plastic. I tried to lure him over to the “dark side,” the fly rod, and his dad said he remembered his grandfather trying to teach him to catch fish on the fly rod and how much of a thrill it was to catch fish on a fly rod. After about 10 minutes or so of chit chat, I finally launched my kayak and was paddling over to one of my spots that had produced sacalait in the past. I was fishing with one of my black and chartreuse fluff butts for about 10 minutes when I saw my strike indicator disappear beneath the murky water. I stiffened up my fly rod and I found myself doubled over with a slab sacalait on the other end. The young man was very impressed on the bank.

My first nice slap on the fluff butt

Five minutes later and my 5 wt was doubled over again. I eased another 15 inch crappie (sacalait) into my kayak. The little boy was so excited now. I think he and his dad were heading over to Bass Pro to purchase a kayak and a fly rod. LOL!

slab number 2

So, you get the picture. Cast, strip, repeat. Cast, strip, wait a while. Repeat. Cast, strip… watch the strike indicator disappear, set the hook and ease another slab into the kayak.

I know. This is getting monotonous

After about an hour of this, the bite stopped, but by then, I had put a half dozen on my stringer. For those of you who don’t know this (I’m sure most subscribers to this blog do), crappie, or sacalait like we call them down here (Native American/French translation = “sack of milk”), is one of the best eating fish that swim in fresh water. When I got home I put some of them on the measuring board.

14.5 inches
Just under 15 inches

This was the largest in the bunch

I sent these pictures with a message to the members of my fly fishing club and I’ll repeat it here. There is so much joy and peace in God’s good outdoors. Get off the couch, throw the gaming devices in the garbage, and get outside and experience the beauty that God has created for us. It is the best therapy out there, it’s less expensive than a psychiatrist, and it can provide you with dinner too. πŸ™‚

Tight loops and tight lines to all of you!

When the Good Lord Provides

It’s been a windy spring down here in south Louisiana so the fishing chances have been slim. However, that doesn’t mean I haven’t gotten a few chances to hit the water between storms. As the title of this post eludes, “I love it when the Good Lord provides.” He provides me with a wonderful family, good health, and yes, even the windy days we have been having. But this is a fishing blog, so let’s get down to it. As our spring break approached, I looked for opportunities to get on the water of my local neighborhood lakes to a little “catch and eat.” I needed some fish for those Friday fish fries. The sacalait just haven’t shown themselves yet, except for maybe a couple here and there, but nothing that would be worthwhile to keep to put in some hot grease. So, I changed tactics and I decided to tie on a hare’s ear nymph and see if the bream and chinquapin would be willing to provide dinner. My hunch proved to be correct one afternoon as I was able to sight fish to some chinquapin and bluegill that were stalking the shallows.

This fat red ear (chinquapin) went for the hare’s ear.
Another large chinquapin
And a few bluegill made it to the fish fry

After a successful afternoon trip, I decided to wake up early Saturday morning to see if I could replicate my luck. I was able to catch a few chunky bass in the morning and then I managed to put a few more big bluegill and a couple sacalait on the stringer.

The LSU popper is still the color of choice around here
These joined the Friday lenten fish fry too.

Well, fast forward to Good Friday morning. I knew my three grandchildren would be heading to Baton Rouge later that day and I wanted to fry fish for them for supper. We had a good downpour overnight so I figured the water would be running over the dam from the upper lake to the lower lake. I got out early to see if the shad were doing their thing at the base of the dam and sure enough, they were in numbers that attracted a lot of bass. I hooked a descent bass early on my musicdoc shad and I then changed my retrieve to allow the fly to work lower in the water column. I was able to land four slab sacalait before the bite stopped. I was just in time to walk my kayak back home to greet my grandchildren. My granddaughter was more than happy to take a picture of Poppie with his fish.

The smile on his face says it all. BTW, the fish weighed a pound and a half.

So, after lunch, I dug up a few worms and offered my three-year-old grandson an opportunity to catch a fish of his own. He had a ball and he caught his first fish ever on his Mickey Mouse rod and reel.

Proud young fisherman
Fish number 2

We had a wonderful Easter with the grandkids and we were sad to see them go. Our weekend was fun of tractor rides, Easter egg hunts, kayaking, dancing, and a crawfish boil. So Monday rolls around and I’m looking at the winds and weather for this week…my off week. Wow. 15-20 mph winds Monday and Tuesday. That’s no good. My wife and I walked the neighborhood Monday and we came on a stash of blackberries. I rode back there later with a gallon ziplock bag and managed to pick about 10 cups of berries, which I turned into some good blackberry jelly.

That’s a gallon sized bag
Which we turned into blackberry jelly

Like the title of this post says, the Good Lord does provide. Oh, and speaking of providing, I got up early this morning before the winds kicked up and I managed to catch 5 nice bass on the LSU deer hair popper. No sacalait though, but that’s OK. These bass were released to go make babies (one was full of eggs)

First Fish of 2022

First Fish of 2022

It’s been over two weeks since the start of the new year and I’ve been able to get on the water of our neighborhood lake twice. The first time, I was completely shut out. Since the new year, we have had cold, damp, windy weather…well except when I’m at work. I have really been looking for an opportunity to get down to our Southeast marshes but the weather…did I mention the weather?

Martin Luther King’s holiday was looking like it might provide me with an opportunity to head to the marsh, but the latest weather report forecast a very cold morning with winds blowing from 10 – 18 mph, which is too windy for me to be in a kayak with a fly rod. So, I decided to get some cleaning done at the house and tie a few deer hair bugs to pass the time. We have a couple of conclaves coming up this spring and I’m going to be donating some flies for the gambler’s draw. I guess you could say I was feeling kind of froggy πŸ™‚

My wife and I went for a walk in the neighborhood and when the sun warmed things up a bit, I decided to put the kayak on wheels and roll on over to the neighborhood lake. I tied on a fly designed by a good buddy of mine, “Catch” Cormier, he calls the Coma Cocahoe. I knew it would be heavy enough to get down to where I was hoping the fish would be in this cold water. About 15 minutes into my afternoon trip, I thought I had hung the bottom, but I soon realized the “bottom” was moving. A short fight later and I was lipping a fat female bass full of eggs.

I did have my scale in the kayak and this girl weighed 3.6 lbs

Hopefully, that was a good omen for 2022! The very next cast, I caught her baby brother.

You can get a good look at the Coma Cocahoe

I fished for about another half hour and I did get a massive strike that nearly pulled my rod out my hands but I never got a good hook set in that one. Anyway, the wind was still blowing pretty hard and the sun was going down behind the trees so it was getting a little too cold. Here’s to a healthy new year to everyone. I pray we put this pandemic in our rear view mirrors.

Tight loops and tight lines to you all!

One More Post for 2021

I didn’t know how to title this post. My choices were several, including “Fun on the 3 wt,” “A Crappie Ending to a Crappy Year,” “The Sunfish Trifecta,” or “Self-Quarantine Fun.” I couldn’t find a winner so I just chose, “One More Post for 2021.” Also, please forgive the two attempts I made at inserting a quick video. Not I cannot seem to be able to delete them. Just read on. πŸ™‚

I had actually been looking forward to this week. I had a whole week off from teaching and I had just said goodbye to my daughter’s family and my three grandchildren. Wouldn’t you know it, the weather got hot, cloudy, and windy…not good redfish sight fishing weather. In fact, the weather looked pretty crappy so I’ve been staying inside, tying flies and cleaning up my tying table.

When I woke up this morning, I couldn’t stand it anymore, so I got a cup of coffee, did my “Bible in a Year” podcast, and I headed out to my neighborhood lake with my kayak in tow, a popper on a 5 wt, and a fluff butt on the 3 wt. I made a valiant attempt to hit the banks with the popper but I was having no luck at all. So I decided to focus on my favorite sunfish, bluegill and red-ear sunfish (chinquapin). I started catching small bluegill right away.

small but pretty
a little larger at 7 inches

I realized that the larger fish were hanging in deeper water, about 8-10 feet from the bank. I then hooked into a descent chinquapin.

These red-ear sunfish are thick and they fight hard on a 3 wt

Not long after that fish, I hooked what is probably my personal best chinquapin on my fly rod.

I measured that big one out at 11 inches on my paddle and I released it.

I was about to call it a day, when I caught my third different species in the sunfish family, a crappie (sacalait).

This one was 9 inches long

I was completely content at this point and I started heading back to my pickup point. That’s when I hooked a larger sacalait.

Now I had just told one of my neighbors who lives on the lake that I wasn’t keeping fish today. Heck, I hadn’t even thought about bringing my stringer because I’ve never caught a bunch of sacalait or big chinquapin in the month of December on the lake. Well, I proceeded to catch three more sacalait (all big enough to fillet) and I released them. That’s when it hit me…we have been eating Christmas leftovers for five days now and it’s time to eat something different. So, I beached my kayak and took the five minute walk over to my house to grab my stringer. I paddled back to where I had caught the last three sacalait, and wouldn’t you know it, I couldn’t get a bite…well for about five minutes or so. Then I caught a nice one…then another… then another.

I had one break my size 3x tippet. I found that to be strange because it broke it off at the loop where I made the loop-to-loop connection. I patiently tied on another three-foot piece of tippet material and another fluff butt and I continued to catch a couple more sacalait before that tippet broke too. I was beginning to wonder if the brand new Orvis 3x tippet was defective. I wasn’t going to chance breaking off again, so I tied on 0x on my 3 wt. πŸ™‚ I finally called it a day with 8 good slabs.

They weren’t “hammers” but they were good-sized “slabs”

Anyway, I couldn’t think of a better way to spend my morning with just two days left to the year. Heck, I’m probably going to try another neighborhood lake tomorrow morning. What a great way to end 2021!

Fried to perfection

A Crappie End to 2021

Fishing Post Hurrican Ida

I got a chance to fish for the first time, post Hurricane Ida this morning. To say the hurricane was catastrophic is an understatement. The national media has just been focused on New Orleans. There are places in rural South Louisiana that will take many years to repair. Some businesses that have been open for 70 plus years were destroyed and will not be rebuilt. We continue to pray for those who have been effected. Personally, my house didn’t receive any damage, except for 150 feet of downed fence. My parents in Thibodaux lost nearly all the shingles on their roof but suffered no major damage. Many, if not most of able-bodied South Louisianans have been helping neighbors, friends, and family. I made it down to the epicenter of the eye-wall, Port Forcheon, to help a friend repair some plumbing on his camp. While his camp suffered major damage, he was fortunate and he will be able to rebuild. Here are some pictures from some of the damage there:

This large houseboat (barge) broke off its mooring, took out an entire camp and damaged much of the boat lifts in the area. Oh, the roof in the foreground belonged to someone’s camp.
My friend’s boat is a total loss. Look how the winds completely removed and relocated the roof.
There was a building on that empty slab. Notice, however, the camps in the background look untouched.

After spending a day down there, I knew I needed to get on the water, but I wasn’t going to be heading south for a while. So, I decided to do some much needed, hurricane recovery at my peaceful, happy place. My view this morning was much more peaceful, as you can see in the next photo. I watched a flock of ten teal buzz over the water as I unloaded my kayak.

A much calmer and tranquil morning.

The fishing was great! I caught 10 bass and lost about a handful as well. They were all caught on a frog-colored deer hair popper, tied on a size 2 hook. This is one of my smaller deer hair bugs tied with rubber skirt legs. The first bass of the morning

The slight fog on the water indicated the water is warmer than the cool morning air.
Bass number 2
Bass number 3. They kept getting bigger.
A chunky number 4
Number 5
Number 6 was 2.75 lbs and was 18 inches long.
Number 7
Here’s number 8. The sun was starting to really get bright at about 8:30.
Number 9 was released quickly back.
Number 10 was another good chunky bass that weighed over 2 pounds.

After the sun had come up pretty good and the topwater bite slowed down, I switched to a baitfish streamer pattern. I had fished with it for about a half hour without a bite. Then I received a text with a couple pictures from my daughter, who is in Orlando with my wife, my son-in-law and the three grandkids. I put my rod down to look at the photo. When I put my phone away and I picked up my rod, I realized I had a fish on. I never got to see it. I tried to set the hook in it and it doubled my rod over. The fish ran underneath my kayak and then it promptly got off. Oh well… that’s fishing. If you’ve followed this blog before, you have read that my friend who owns this lake wants me to harvest fish under 15 inches. So, I took home six for supper.

Today’s harvest

Please pray for those who’ve lost so much to this hurricane. Everyone I spoke to yesterday said they would rebuild. They will build it stronger. It seems after each hurricane, we learn more about how to effectively build to withstand strong winds from a major hurricane. I just hope I don’t have to see another one like this one in my lifetime.

Until then, tight loops and tight lines!

Dog Days of Summer (Video)

Dog Days of Summer get you down? Pandemic get you down? Then, check out my latest video. I spent 2 hours at a friend’s lake/pond and I was able to entice a few bass to eat a deer-hair frog popper. The days are actually getting shorter and I think there is a little bit of thermal cooling taking place. That, coupled with some afternoon showers, is gradually cooling the water enough to get them to come back to the shallows to feed on frogs and baby bream. Enjoy!

Happy 5th of July :)

That’s not a typo…Happy July 5th…well.. I mean, I had a happy trip to my neighborhood lake this morning. My body clock woke me up at 5:30 so I grabbed a cup of coffee, put my kayak on wheels, grabbed two 5 wt rods and my 3 wt. and I carted my yak a block and a half to my neighborhood lake. My goal was to relax and just catch fish. I began with a hare’s ear nymph under a strike indicator and I started catching small bluegill.

It was a bit foggy and there was a slight mist on the water. I heard a few splashes from some feeding bass, so I switched over to a deer hair popper in one of my frog patterns. I was working some water near some overhanging brush in the water when I caught my first bass, a feisty 10-inch fish. I quickly released that fish and began to wonder if maybe a pattern would develop. Two casts later, I was fighting a very feisty 14-inch bass that went airborne several times.

This feisty fish went airborne several times. Notice the frog pattern popper by its tail.

If you take a closer look at the photo, you can see the overgrown brush by the water’s edge. I began to think that the bass were sitting in the shade, waiting for an easy meal. So, I continued to work that stretch of water. After about 10 minutes or so, I found myself stripping my popper parallel to the edge when a massive explosion of water struck my fly. I set the hook hard and I knew right away it was a big fish. This bass dug down and took off for deeper water at first. It started pulling my kayak and then it doubled back toward the cover where it probably was initially hiding in wait for an easy meal. I tried to turn it but it dug down into a bunch of cover and my line had wrapped around the branches of a sunken tree limb. You know that sinking feeling when you know you’re about to lose a good fish? Well I had that feeling. I’m sure at that point I started talking to that fish, calling it a few names I won’t repeat here. That son-of-a-gun was a smart fish! I didn’t quite know how to approach this. If I tried to horse it out, it would surely break my tippet and the fish would be gone. So, I gave it some slack, thinking it might unwrap itself and head back out to open water. That didn’t work. My third idea was to reach my hand down and grab the limb and pull it up toward me. I thought I could land the limb and the fish. I started pulling the heavy branch up but the best I could do, was get the fish closer to me where I could see its size. I nearly tipped my kayak over a couple of times trying to pull the limb up while I kept tension on the fish. Finally, I worked my fingers down the tippet until I found the branch it was wrapped around and I was able to snap the branch. The fish took off…still hooked! By this time, one of the the people who lives on the lake had seen the commotion and he walked over to the water’s edge to see if I would land it. As long as I could keep it in open water, I felt like I had a chance. Finally, what seemed like forever (well maybe 5 minutes), I lipped the fish and brought it over the side of my kayak.

This was a very healthy fish.
It’s hard to get a perspective on just how big its mouth was. Here, you can see how this 1/0 popper looks tiny in its mouth.
This fish measured 20.5 inches.

I wish I had a scale with me. My last digital scale got soaked and it doesn’t work anymore. I would conservatively estimate that it was between 4 and a half to 5 pounds, but I’ll never know for sure. Maybe I’ll catch it again some day. By now, I thought I had found a pattern. I had caught three bass in a 50 yard stretch of water within a half hour of each other. I continued to work the same bank and 15 minutes later, I had caught another bass. This one wasn’t as big as the last one but it was a descent fish at around 14 inches.

It was around 8 AM now and the sun had burned through the early morning fog. I wasn’t getting any more action with my popper, so I switched back to my hare’s ear nymph. I continued to catch bream and must to my enjoyment, I was able to catch bluegill, a red-ear sunfish (chinquapin) and a pumpkin-seed sunfish.

Close-up of the bluegill
Close-up of the pretty red-ear
Closeup of the pumpkin seed, the prettiest member of the sunfish family (in my opinion)

I had a few more areas I wanted to try, in search of bull bream but the big bluegills and chinquapin just haven’t shown themselves since the flood of 2016. Since I had caught three different species of sunfish (well 4 if you call a bass a sunfish) I thought I’d try to see if I could catch a crappie and make it five different fish. I tied on a chartreuse and black fluff butt and began working some downed timber and the posts to a bridge that I have had some success in previous trips. I didn’t get any crappie to hit but I did get another descent-sized bass to eat my fluff butt.

This one was long but wasn’t as fat as the others I had caught this morning.

Well, It was nearing 10 when I decided to call it a morning. I had grass to cut and other honey dos to get to before the rain comes this afternoon. It was a “happy” and productive morning. I hope yours was too.

Tight loops and tight lines to you all!